Research Projects

  1. Fiscal policy and electoral politics
  2. Transnational actors in global governance with an emphasis on environmental governance
  3. Legitimacy in global governance

    Fiscal policy and electoral politics

    earth

    Unequal Europe: Redistribution, reelection, and inequality in the European Union (Regional Studies Association, 2015-2017)

    Inequality in the EU has soared since the end of the cold war. For most EU citizens, inequality is a palpable problem as it may pose significant barriers to people’s opportunities and well-being. And, those who enjoy higher incomes are also those with better health, better education, and greater capacity to participate in politics and make their needs and values known to government officials. This project examines the linkages between grant programs, electoral politics, and economic inequality in the EU. It develops a rational-choice institutionalist explanation for the linkages between government benefits, electoral politics, and economic inequality in multilevel polities. Using original data at the subnational (i.e. regional) level, it shows under which conditions government funds redistributed through the EU budget combat economic inequality in Europe’s regions.


    stock

    The choice for Europe since Maastricht: Member states' preferences for economic and financial policy (Horizon 2020, 2015-2018)

    This Horizon-funded project focuses on EU member states’ fiscal policy positions during and in the aftermath of the global financial crisis 2007–2008. Many models of a fiscal union have been proposed and discussed. What is missing are not ideas and economic analysis, but the political consensus among member states’ governments for a specific integration path. To understand why EU member states collectively responded to the recent global financial crisis through fiscal policy reforms the way they did, we study the positions of member states’ governments on different models of a fiscal union in the project The choice for Europe since Maastricht: Member states' preferences for economic and financial policy. I am a co-investigator for this project (principal investigator: Jonas Tallberg), which is part of a Europe-wide consortium coordinated by Sonja Puntscher-Riekmann at the University of Salzburg.

      Transnational actors in global governance with an emphasis on environmental governance

      earth

      Sustainable development in a changing geo-political era: Challenges and opportunities for Sweden (Mistra, 2017-2020)

      While there is widespread agreement on the potentially disastrous consequences of ongoing processes of environmental change, we know little about the governance responses by states and international environmental institutions (IEIs) to address policy challenges related to geopolitical and environmental dynamics. Governance responses refer to institutions, organizations, and policies put in place for the purpose of addressing a given societal problem. We need to better understand governance responses to climate security dynamics, which may have far-reaching implications for the prospects of global governance toward sustainable development.

      My research within the research program Mistra GEOPOLITICS, funded by the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research (Mistra) (principal investigator: Björn-Ola Linnér at the University of Linköping), addresses this research problem. It examines how the dynamics of geopolitics, human security, and global environmental change interrelate. It concerns how our society needs to be reformed in order to address increasing resource scarcity while securing a positive development and political stability in the 21st Century - an epoch referred to as the 'Anthropocene'. The program brings together six Swedish core partners: the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI), the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), and the universities of Linköping, Lund, Stockholm, and Uppsala.

      I lead the work package on 'Governance responses to climate related security risks' at Stockholm University, which seeks to understand states and IEIs’ governance responses to climate security challenges, and the roles of transnational actors, such as civil society organizations and multinational corporations, in shaping the effectiveness of IEIs’ governance responses.


      tree

      Transnational governance of the university field (Riksbankens Jubileumsfonds/Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation, 2016-2020).

      This project focuses predominantly on the roles and functions of transnational actors in global governance of universities and higher education. We seek to better understand the roles of intermediary organizations such as peak research associations, civil society organizations, foundations, and intergovernmental organizations, which diffuse ideas and norms between those who are governed (i.e. universities and research institutes) and those who govern (i.e. states delegating power to global governance arrangements).

      I am co-investigator for the research program Transnational governance of the university field (UniGov) funded by Riksbankens Jubileumsfonds in collaboration with Formas, Forte, and the Swedish Research Council (principal investigator: Filip Wijkström at the Stockholm School of Economics).

        Legitimacy in global governance

        dad

        Elite communication and the social legitimacy of international organizations (Swedish Research Council, 2016-2019)

        Extensive research suggests that legitimacy makes it easier for international organizations, such as the United Nations, the World Health Organization, and the African Union, to gain support for ambitious policy goals, secure ratification of negotiated agreements, and achieve domestic compliance with international rules. Yet, despite the importance of legitimacy for international cooperation, we know little about the process through which individual citizens and elites come to perceive of IOs as legitimate or not.

        I am principal investigator for the project Elite communication and the social legitimacy of international organizations funded by the Swedish Research Council. This project focuses on how, when and why political and societal elites, such as governments and civil society organizations, can change citizens' opinions about international organizations.

        Publications:

        Dellmuth, L.M. and Chalmers, A.W., “All spending is not equal: European Union public spending, policy feedback, and citizens’ support for the EU”, European Journal of Political Research, forthcoming.

        Dellmuth, L.M., "The knowledge gap in world politics: Assessing the sources of citizen awareness of the United Nations Security Council", Review of International Studies, 42:2 (2016), pp. 673-700.

        This article was discussed by the Nereus foundation. See related LegGov blog article.


        un

        Legitimacy in global governance (Riksbankens Jubileumsfonds/Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation, 2016-2022)

        We analyze the sources, patterns, and consequences of international organizations' legitimacy in a research program entitled Legitimacy in global governance and funded by Riksbankens Jubileumsfonds and led by Jonas Tallberg (“Legitimacy in Global Governance”), for which I am a co-investigator. In this research program, I coordinate the group focusing on the sources of IOs’ legitimacy, including Jonas Tallberg, Soetkin Verhaegen, and Jan Aart Scholte.

        Check out the project homepage at http://www.statsvet.su.se/leggov (principal investigator: Jonas Tallberg).

        Publications:

        Dellmuth, L.M. and Tallberg, J. Elite Communication and Popular Legitimacy in Global Governance, Unpubished manuscript: Stockholm, Stockholm University.

        Contact:

        To visit me, go to: Department of Economic History, Stockholm University, Universitetsvägen 10A, 9th floor, SE-10691 Stockholm.

        To send me stuff, write to: Department of Economic History, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm.

        Or email me.